PHI 103 The truth table for a valid deductive argument will show


Asked by 9 months ago
19.9 billion brain cells

The truth table for a valid deductive argument will show

 

wherever the premises are true, the conclusion is true.

 

that the premises are false.

that some premises are true, some premises false.

wherever the premises are true, the conclusion is false.

 

 

A conditional sentence with a false antecedent is always

 

true.

 

false.

Cannot be determined.

not a sentence.

 

 

The sentence "P  Q" is read as

 

P or Q

P and Q

If P then Q

 

Q if and only P

 

 

In the conditional "P  Q," "P" is a

 

sufficient condition for Q.

 

sufficient condition for P.

necessary condition for P.

necessary condition for Q.

 

 

What is the truth value of the sentence "P & ~ P"?

 

True

False

 

Cannot be determined

Not a sentence

 

 

"P v Q" is best interpreted as

 

P or Q but not both P and Q

P or Q or both P and Q

 

Not both P or Q

P if and only if Q

 

 

Truth tables can determine which of the following?

 

If an argument is valid

 

If an argument is sound

If a sentence is valid

All of the above

 

 

One of the disadvantages of using truth tables is

 

it is difficult to keep the lines straight

T's are easy to confuse with F's.

they grow exponentially and become too large for complex arguments.

 

they cannot distinguish strong inductive arguments from weak inductive arguments.

 

"~ P v Q" is best read as

 

Not P and Q

It is not the case that P and it is not the case that Q

It is not the case that P or Q

 

It is not the case that P and Q

 

 

In the conditional "P  Q," "Q is a

 

sufficient condition for Q.

sufficient condition for P.

necessary condition for P.

 

necessary condition for Q.

1 Answer

Answered by 9 months ago
20.2 billion brain cells

Verified Expert Answer -- Instant Download

Thumbnail of first page

Excerpt from file: 1 Logic Tutorial The truth table for a valid deductive argument will show wherever the premises are true, the conclusion is true. that the premises

Filename: L1057.pdf

Filesize: 281.0K

Downloads: 58

Print Length: 4 Pages/Slides

Words: 130


Account not required

Answer this question

Surround your text in *italics* or **bold**, to write a math equation use, for example, $x^2+2x+1=0$ or $$\beta^2-1=0$$
Use LaTeX to type formulas and markdown to format text. See example.

Create Account

  • Welcome! Please create an account to answer this question.

Already a member?

  • Welcome! Sign-in to answer this question.